Bundoora Homestead Art Centre

Urban & Iconic

March 26, 2014 - April 27, 2014

There is now no debate as to whether or not street art and its practitioners have been accepted into the mainstream consciousness. Embraced by tourism as a means to attract visitors, exploited by advertising agencies as hip backdrops to sell the latest urban SUV, and hashtagged to hell and back on social media networks; the image of street art and graffiti and what it represents is here to stay.

But exactly what it represents remains a contentious issue. Born from a necessity to rebel and express, graffiti & street art have developed to a point where it has penetrated the upper echelons of fine-art institutions around the world. It’s purists versus progressives and those that steadfastly cling to sentimental ideals and refuse to evolve get left behind.

Embracing the movement, it is forward-thinking initiatives such as the ‘Urban and Iconic’ exhibition sponsored by Darebin City Council that further legitimise the seriousness of the art form and its ever-increasing profile.

This exhibition symbolises the confluence of Australia’s rich artistic history with the present day; showcasing a variety of styles, approaches and the depth of introspective extension the medium and its artists have beyond its mainstream commodification. It aims to demystify stigmas attached to street art and educate viewers by recontexualising a selection of studio works from artists who all have a well-documented history of liberating blank walls without asking for permission.

Curated by Juddy Roller Studios, this exhibition showcases street art styles from local and internationally renowned artists currently practicing in Melbourne and features works by Adnate, Choq, Conrad, Drew, Jaws, Lucy Lucy, Makatron, Mayonaise,Rashe, Slicer and Tom Civil.

This exhibition celebrates National Youth Week, 4-13 April, 2014, and is presented by Bundoora Homestead Art Centre in partnership with Community Safety, City of Darebin and Juddy Roller Studios.